Page generated Oct. 22nd, 2017 13:38
[syndicated profile] wordpresstrac_feed

Posted by vinlandmedia

Using custom tables, and in this case I have a parent-child relationship. The following query works fine interactively:

SELECT wp_books.name, wp_chapters.name FROM wp_books, wp_chapters WHERE wp_books.id = wp_chapters.book_id;

In Wordpress (using $wpdb->get_results) the query only returns a single column, the latter (wp_chapters.name).

If I use any other column combination (i.e. not two "name" fields) the query works in Wordpress.

Wondering if this might be a bug.

[syndicated profile] wordpresstrac_feed

Posted by vinlandmedia

Using custom tables, and in this case I have a parent-child relationship. The following query works fine interactively:

SELECT wp_books.name, wp_chapters.name FROM wp_books, wp_chapters WHERE wp_books.id = wp_chapters.book_id;

In Wordpress (using $wpdb->get_results) the query only returns a single column, the latter (wp_chapters.name).

If I use any other column combination (i.e. not two "name" fields) the query works in Wordpress.

Wondering if this might be a bug.

Session #67: Peaceful Serenity

Oct. 22nd, 2017 14:54
schneefink: Parker grinning, from First David Job (Parker smiling before jumping off a buil)
[personal profile] schneefink
I love playing D&D.

After our unexpected fight and victory against our enemy's head spy, we were looking for the gem with the soul of my undead minion.

The next sessions were so much fun that I wrote fic about it :D
Surviving Caterpillars
Featuring, among other things, my undead cat familiar fighting a dragon. I don't know how much sense it'll make for anyone not familiar with our campaign, but I enjoyed writing it a lot.

After that came the attack on the city occupied by enemy forces. Details )

Leaving for Dallas

Oct. 22nd, 2017 15:35
cimorene: (yo)
[personal profile] cimorene
I'm going to be in the Dallas metro area for my little sister's wedding next week. Leaving Tuesday, and I'll be there until Nov 2. There will be family stuff and wedding stuff and I will be stocking up on things I have trouble buying in Finland like cotton yoga pants and cotton terry-lined socks.

And I'm PRETTY sure I don't know anybody in the Dallas area anymore from fandom, but feel free to contact me here or on Twitter if I've forgotten anyone.

On Trigger Warnings

Oct. 22nd, 2017 12:52
miss_s_b: (Mood: Facepalm)
[personal profile] miss_s_b
I see the Grauniad have seen fit to publish yet another wilful misunderstanding of the purpose of trigger warnings today, this time from David Mitchell.

Trigger Warnings are there to give people extra information about the media they are consuming. It's like when the continuity announcer says before the showing of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre that "this film contains strong language and scenes that some viewers might find upsetting". It's not censorship to allow people to make a free and informed choice about their media consumption.

The purpose of a trigger warning is to be courteous to people who have PTSD. It's not saying "do not read this". It's saying "if you read this, be mentally prepared to see something that might trigger PTSD flashbacks".

If you really think that allowing people to make an informed choice about something that could cause them a panic attack is a bad thing, then I think you are an inconsiderate, thoughtless arsehole. Sorry.

Weekly Check In October 22

Oct. 22nd, 2017 12:35
tanaqui: Illumiinated letter T (Default)
[personal profile] tanaqui posting in [community profile] thisfinecrew
As there haven't been any posts in the comm this week, I've just repeated most of the links for ways to donate to hurricane relief efforts. Feel free to add more links (for anything) in the comments or tell us what you've been up to.

Housekeeping (the usual stuff)

Reminder that we have a suggestion post if there’s a topic that you’d like to see discussed but would like to ask the mods to look into. This can be anything from general information, or a how-to-do-a-thing, or something you may want to discuss as a community. Folks are welcome to post directly to the comm as always, but if you’re not comfortable/don’t have spoons, we can help too.

As we don't always get the time to pull things out of the suggestions post into their own separate posts, it may be worth checking every week (or tracking the post) to see if there's any new information you're interested in.

Also if you need help with tags, PM [personal profile] redbird, who is our tag guru. Both [personal profile] tassosss and I are very grateful for the help.

Hurricane relief

Lin-Manuel Miranda made a thing for Puerto Rico
[community profile] fandomlovespuertorico is live! Go and bid -- bidding for the main auction closes 6pm EST, Monday October 23rd but there are other auctions/activities listed over there
Links for how to help with the relief efforts for Irma and Maria
For lots of links for hurricane relief for Harvey, see the check-in post from two weeks ago

So, what have you all been up to in the last week or are planning to get involved in next week?

Poll #18974 The Week
Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 3


This week, I....

View Answers

called my one senator
1 (50.0%)

called my other senator
1 (50.0%)

called my representative
1 (50.0%)

called my governor
0 (0.0%)

called my state reps
1 (50.0%)

sent a postcard/email/letter/fax
1 (50.0%)

attended a town hall
0 (0.0%)

donated money to a cause
0 (0.0%)

attended an in-person activist group
0 (0.0%)

participated in phone/online training
0 (0.0%)

View Answers

went to a protest
0 (0.0%)

signed up for alerts
1 (50.0%)

took care of myself
0 (0.0%)

not a US citizen but worked in solidarity in my own community
1 (50.0%)

did something else
0 (0.0%)

committed to action in the coming week
0 (0.0%)


icon_uk: (Default)
[personal profile] icon_uk posting in [community profile] scans_daily
Justice League Action has been producing some terrific episodes, taking a sort of "Brave and the Bold" take on the wider DC Universe.

They've also released a series of shorts, and I think I rather like this one which showcases some problems encountered when Firestorm faces Metallo and tries to transmute his Kryptonite heart.

Wackiness ensues )

and for my next trick

Miraculous Ladybug Season 2 )
miss_s_b: Vince Cable's happy face (Politics: Vince - happy face)
[personal profile] miss_s_b
... However, as it is for publication in Liberator, you'll have to wait to read it :þ

Once Liberator has landed on doormats I'll put the review up on Goodreads and link to it here. But if you want a little spoiler, although I had some criticisms I genuinely quite enjoyed it, and will definitely buy his next (if he ever writes another).
[syndicated profile] wordpresstrac_feed

Posted by schlessera

The REST API post status controller has the following code to make a read-only permissions check for viewing the post statuses:

<?php
if ( 'edit' === $request['context'] ) {
   $types = get_post_types( array( 'show_in_rest' => true ), 'objects' );
   foreach ( $types as $type ) {
      if ( current_user_can( $type->cap->edit_posts ) ) {
         return true;
      }
   }
   return new WP_Error( 'rest_cannot_view', __( 'Sorry, you are not allowed to edit posts in this post type.' ), array( 'status' => rest_authorization_required_code() ) );
}

This seems to be left-over copy-pasta from the post types controller.

I'd suggest sending the following WP_Error message instead:

__( 'Sorry, you are not allowed to manage post statuses.' )
[syndicated profile] wordpresstrac_feed

Posted by transl8or

I'm not sure if this is a bug in Twenty Seventeen or meant to be by design.

After creating 3 galleries the same way with the new Gallery-Widget (6 pictures, 3 in a row, thumbnail view, linked to media file) and placing them in 3 differnt locations in Twenty Seventeen (Sidebar, Footer One, Footer Two) they all appear a little different in size and hover-style.

Especially when placed in the footer area the pictures show a small 3 pixel frame at the bottom when hovering over one. Thats not the case when a gallery is placed in the sidebar.

Also the picture size of a gallery differs a lot between footer one and footer two in Twenty Seventeen.
Is this meant to be that way?

As said, I created 3 galleries with the new widget the same way: same pictures, same order, thumbnails, linked to, etc. ...

Test enviroment: Windows with latest Firefox 56.x.

Ever-fixed mark (Part 3)

Oct. 22nd, 2017 10:44
the_comfortable_courtesan: image of a fan c. 1810 (Default)
[personal profile] the_comfortable_courtesan

Next morning Hannah went into the hothouses to cut some flowers to replace a bloom here and there in the vases that went droop, and discovered her brother Julius about some matter of tending pots.

He smiled at her. What, not up and about with Miss Flora?

I daresay she sleeps in, to recover from her journey.

Indeed the Channel crossing will knock one up! But – he turned around with a serious expression upon his face – has she said aught about Beauf – Sallington’s – suit to her?

Not yet.

Only – he sighed – there is some notion of the Duke’s that Beauf might set up his own establishment at Nitherholme, and he was saying, did he do so, might I not go with him and do somewhat about the gardens, that were never particular tended to, save for the herb garden when Lady Jane resided there, and have been much neglected since then, one could have a free hand in doing the thing, 'tis not like Qualling or the grounds of Mulcaster House, so there would not be established gardeners jealous of their place and saying, has always been done thus and so –

Oh, Julius, surely you would love that!

Also, Julius went on with a longing look, 'tis moorland country thereabouts, and I confide would be an almost untrodden field for the botanist –

Sure all sounds entire ideal –

- but one must suppose that his plans would be different did he intend to go marry.

One had to know Julius extreme well to know that he was most extreme concerned about this matter. Indeed it would be a considerable advancement for him, and Hannah knew how great a friendship there had ever been 'twixt him and Lord Sallington. Certainly he might fear that marriage would cause a breach – but was it Flora, that had been part of the same nursery-set? how could that create a gulph?

And then she looked at her brother and wondered. Had she not had particular opportunity to observe the very fine manly affection that existed 'twixt His Lordship and Mr MacDonald?

Why, she said, I daresay Flora will tell me soon enough.

In the afternoon she climbed once more to their meeting place, where Flora was already sitting, clasping her arms about her knees in her old way. Hannah went to squeeze in beside her.

Dearest Hannah Clorinda, said Flora, sure there is a thing I am almost frighted to ask you: but has there been with you any matter of falling in love?

Hannah laughed. Fie, who should I go fall in love with?

Why, how should I know, being away so long?

Hannah looked sideways at Flora. Well, she said, resisting the desire to teaze, I will confess that I have the greatest admiration and, 'tis true to say, affection, towards His Lordship and Mr MacDonald, that are both always so very kind to me. But they are quite out of my sphere, and naught that I would go pine for – and indeed, sure I take the entire apprehension that 'twould be a very foolish thing to set my girlish hopes upon 'em.

You were ever a sensible creature, sighed Flora. For I find myself – found myself, mayhap I will discover that matters are different when we are no longer under the Italian sun, or strolling in balmy moonlight and a little smoky glow from the burning mountain – somewhat unexpected smitten.

She sighed once more. We encountered Quintus and his friends in Venice and it perchanced I saw a good deal of Beauf, and then we went our ways, and then we met once more in Naples, and I found myself in a considerable liking to him, and indeed he to me, and there was a mention of marriage, but I said that perchance we were beguiled by the exceeding romantic setting –

- but 'twas not just that concern that halted me from saying yes to his offer.

She looked down at her hands pressing together. O, dear, Hannah, I like him most extremely, but I greatly dislike the thought of being a duchess. For one sees his stepmother, a most excellent learned lady, that I daresay would greatly prefer to spend a deal more time in her study than her duties of rank permit, and does not complain, but will sometimes let little things drop – will come in from some occasion and say she has been about duchessing, with a twist of her mouth.

And then, my dearest Tiger - she looked sideways at Hannah, who kept her face entirely straight – why, what may I call her? She would not have me call her mama, says 'tis a title she would not steal from Mama, so 'tis a pet name ‘twixt the two of us. But she says, that one should ever think when contemplating marriage that the duties of marriage will include matters to do with one’s husband’s station or profession, if only by behaving proper to that – that is, does one marry a clergyman there is a deal of proper behaviour expected in the matter of church attendance and parish duties &C, almost to act the ancillary curate, and if one marries a doctor one does not gossip upon his patients any more than he would, and must not complain is he called out at all hours to some urgent case.

She leant her head upon Hannah’s shoulder. And said, sure one may see married couples that are entire partners, like unto Mama and Papa, or the Wallaces, or the Samuels, or as 'twas with the Verikers – oh, that was sad news – but indeed, she says, a woman does not always realize in advance what will come to her, but must adapt to circumstances.

And however fond and kind a husband may be, 'tis quite out of the common that he will go encourage her ambitions as Mr Lucas does, that insists that Mrs Lucas has her own study in the rectory. That she confides he would do even was there not the matter of her fortune in the balance.

She fell silent.

Also, she said at length, I like Beauf most extremely, but I have found that I am also given to finding other fellows agreeable, if only for a while. I daresay, she went on, you have read, or mayhap heard, the marriage service? That I confide is not in particular different among Methodists from what pertains in the Established Church – sure one hears that the Quakers do the matter differently –

Dearest Flora, 'tis unlike you to babble.

- and while there is a deal of matter in’t that one could mostly happily swear to, there are some things… even more than the forsaking all others, there is that dread word obey. And Tiger says I should mind what a deal of rights the law and custom assign to husbands, and how little to wives. Sure, she said, a woman – or her prudent advisors – may tie up any fortune she has, but there has to be that forethought took, and even then, there are husbands will endeavour come around their wives by persuasion or even violence.

Hannah sighed. Indeed 'tis so.

But the thing that I always come at, Flora continued, squeezing Hannah, is that I would not wish to be parted from you. And sure I find it hard to come at any way one might marry and still have one’s dearest friend about one. I suppose you might come be my companion, but – she planted a kiss upon Hannah’s head – I should dislike to put you in that position of dependency -

Oh, she cried, but I am a selfish fool! Doubtless you have your own plans and ambitions –

Why, said Hannah, I confide that although I lead a most exceeding pleasant existence here, undertaking the flowers for the house and tending to the library, 'tis not a course I may continue entirely indefinitely. And latterly I was discoursing of the matter to Mr MacDonald, and he advanced the thought that I might go make a living by my pen -

Why, my darling, indeed you might. For Mr MacDonald had most thoughtful laid by for us copies of The Intelligencer, marked up with matters of particular interest, and Tiger was most prepossessed by those pieces of yours on historical ladies.

Hannah felt herself blushing all over. But sure I did not see quite how I might come at that.

Flora clasped her knees again and rocked a little in the old wonted fashion when she was thinking something over.

At length she said, hesitantly, you know that Tiger has a fine property in Surrey -

O yes, Yeomans, 'twas where Mama met Papa –

Say you so! – 'twas let for many years to the Ulrichs, very fine people, some connexion of the Samuels, but at present stands empty, and she does not go seek new tenants until certain repairs and refurbishments are made. And it comes to me, might we not ask her could we go live there, and devote our lives to study and writing and doing somewhat about the parlous condition of womanhood - for I apprehend that 'tis not an entire out of the common thing, for two ladies to live together and pursue their interests, like Lady Emily Merrett and Miss Fenster at Attervale –

- but are they not somewhat older ladies, past their marriageable years?

O, now, but I have heard that Lady Emily was one of the belles of the Season when they first went there, her suitors were entire desolated.

O, said Hannah, longingly, surely that would be excellent fine, but I confide that there would be objections -

O, poo, to objections! said Flora. Do I go convoke with Tiger upon the business I daresay she will come at some way it might be contrived.

Hannah clutched Flora’s hand. O, Flora! I should like it of all things.

Orthodoxy in Oxford

Oct. 22nd, 2017 08:55
naraht: Orthodox church in Romania (art-RomaniaPantocrator)
[personal profile] naraht
One of the things that I loved most about Russia was being able to pass any random church – usually a beautiful Baroque church – and know that it was an Orthodox church. And the fact that there was usually a service going on, which meant that I could go in, light a few candles and stand for a few minutes to enjoy the architecture and the singing before going on with my sightseeing. (There's no expectation that you'll arrive on time, or indeed stay till the end, as long as you know the points of the service during which you're not meant to leave.)

Back in Oxford, I'm really missing it. I would go to church much more if it could be this simple - if I could just pop in between the farmer's market and the cafe as part of my weekend routine. In the week and a half I was in Russia, I went to more church services than I've been to in years. (Not to mention wore a headscarf more than I ever have... it was a good chance to use all the scarves I have lying around.)

Really I shouldn't complain. I know there are places, like in the American South, where you have to drive for hours to get to an Orthodox church. I grew up in a town with one, and I've just discovered that we have four here in Oxford, not two as I'd originally thought.

• the Greek Orthodox/Russian Orthodox one, the oldest Orthodox church in Oxford and the home of Kallistos Ware, which is unfortunately a long walk from my house
• the other Russian Orthodox church (Patriarchate of Moscow), which is also a bit of a hike
• a Romanian Orthodox church
• an Indian Orthodox church (Malenkara Orthodox Syrian)

Whether or not I manage to get off my couch within the next half an hour to go to church this morning, I must definitely plan to visit the latter two sometime - particularly the last, as I've never been to an Oriental Orthodox church before. We shall see...

ETA: I ended up going to the other Russian church, which I hadn't visited before in its new home, and turns out to be only 20 minutes walk. Not too bad.
lilacsigil: 12 Apostles rocks, text "Rock On" (12 Apostles)
[personal profile] lilacsigil
Title: Movement and Stillness

Characters/Pairing: Breq/Seivarden unrequited

Fandom/Universe: Imperial Radch

Rating and Content Notes: Teen

Word count: 1760

Notes: Thanks to [personal profile] st_aurafina 2017.

Summary: Seivarden feels like she is still in stasis while Breq rushes onward, but there are two sides to every coin.

Movement and Stillness )

Also at AO3
rydra_wong: Lee Miller photo showing two women wearing metal fire masks in England during WWII. (Default)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Politico: Young subscribers flock to old media

What's particularly fascinating is the way in which it's directly correlated with people wanting to support news organizations as a way to resist Trump:

“The big boost we saw in subscriptions in the U.S.,” Newman said, “is driven by people on the left and younger people are more likely to be on the left. That is really a lot of what’s driving it: young people who don’t like Trump who subscribe to news organizations that they see as being a bulwark against him.”

Keep up the good work!
[syndicated profile] smartbitches_feed

Posted by Elyse

Duke of Desire
A | BN | K | iB
 When people come to me for historical recommendations I always tell them about the Maiden Lane series by Elizabeth Hoyt. Honestly, it’s my favorite historical series out there, and while the books are connected, they can easily be read as stand-alones, which makes it perfect for binge reading. Hold that thought because we’ve got a chance for one lucky winner to do just that.

I love this series because it’s got a breathless pace. I would categorize it as historical action/ adventure. It’s also got some of the best anti-heroes (Lazarus Huntington, anyone?) and tough-as-nails heroines I’ve ever read. Add masked vigilantes, some light bondage, a Beauty and the Beast novel, set to low for 8 hours, stir before serving, and you have a recipe for all of Elyse’s catnip.

After twelve books, the series is wrapping up, which is giving me all the bittersweet feels. Author Elizabeth Hoyt agreed to answer a few of my questions about the Maiden Lane world.

Elyse: First of all, thanks for being super cool at RT in Dallas when I showed up in the lobby in my pajamas to meet you. I’m pretty sure my PJs had cats in astronaut gear on them, I was holding a glass of champagne, and you didn’t bat an eyelash.

Elizabeth Hoyt: Ha! I think that was after another looong RITAs program…. PJs sounded like a good idea.

Elyse: One of the things I love so much about the Maiden Lane series is that it has such a strong action/ adventure element to it. We have masked vigilantes, river pirates, and dukes working to bring down cults. The characters are always moving, always doing, and often in danger. How do you incorporate all these different elements into your world? As a writer, is it difficult to maintain that kind of pace?

Wicked Intentions
A | BN | K | iB
Elizabeth Hoyt: You know, I didn’t consciously set out to write action-y romances when I first started writing. But a lot of what I like in romances — swordfights! Concealed identities! People being saved from death and maiming! — are a byproduct of action. Also, it turns out that I’m easily bored, which may be part of the reason there’s always new, exciting things going on in my books. What sometimes becomes problematic is keeping the level of intensity consistent from book to book in a series.

Elyse: This series has a very distinct sense of time and place. You write in the Georgian era around the 1730’s and 1740’s, well before the Regency. What made you want to write about this specific period in English history?

Elizabeth Hoyt: I think it’s more interesting. The time is slightly more earthy, the dresses are (in my opinion) more elegant, and the guys are wearing wigs and swords. Lots of things are happening socially and economically. London’s population is exploding, the Enlightenment is blooming, the agricultural revolution is beginning, and people are discovering real science. All the great action adventure romances in movies and books were set in this time period — Scaramouche, Captain Blood, The Scarlet Pimpernel—and my favorite as a very impressionable twelve year old—Poldark.

Elyse: My favorite Maiden Lane heroes are always the anti-heroes. When I recommend Wicked Intentions I tell people the hero was like Lucius Malfoy if he was a romance hero who was also into bondage. The Duke of Montgomery reminds me of Patrick Jane, one of my favorite TV characters. And then there’s Mickey O’Connor, an actual pirate. All of these heroes do some really dubious things, are clearly flawed, yet somehow totally work as heroes. How do you balance the anti-hero and hero out so they don’t alienate the reader? Are your heroes inspired by any historical or pop culture figures?

Elizabeth Hoyt: I think the writer has to reveal the anti-hero’s humanity to the reader to make them work. The reader has to sympathize with the character if not his actions. But I don’t worry about alienating the reader too much. I think a lot of romance writers don’t take enough risks with their villainy heroes—they’re too worried that readers won’t like the character. If a few readers don’t loathe a character, others won’t love him.

I don’t really base my characters on real or fictional figures, though I’ve certainly been inspired by them. Case in point, Lazarus’s look in Wicked Intentions was a direct result of seeing Jason Isaacs in a long, white-blond wig in the Harry Potter films, OMG.

Duke of Sin
A | BN | K | iB
I started thinking about a true villainous hero while watching 3:10 to Yuma with Russell Crowe. I was fascinated by his character in that movie—he’s the villain and he’s obviously either a sociopath or close to it, but he’s also the most enthralling character in the movie, with a weird sort of masculine ethos that’s almost heroic. That line of thought eventually (several years later) ended in Val in Duke of Sin. Val also owes quite a bit to Tom Hiddleston’s portrayal of Loki. 😉

Elyse: You also write really tough, resilient heroines. Lady Phoebe Batten from Dearest Rogue is blind, and determined to prove to her protector that it doesn’t hold her back at all. Temperance and her sister Silence are both faced with some really dire circumstances that they approach with remarkable grit. And Alf from Duke of Pleasure is basically Batman. Who is your favorite heroine? Who was the most fun to write?

Elizabeth Hoyt: I think Phoebe is my favorite heroine — she’s just so strong and cheerful — and it was a fun challenge to write her POV scenes without any visual descriptions. I really enjoyed writing Alf, not only because she’s a smartass but because swordfights! In a dress!

Elyse: As sad as I am to see this series end, I’m excited for what’s to come. Can you tell us what you’re working on next?

Elizabeth Hoyt: I’ve been dodging this question for the last several months—not because I didn’t have something I’ve been working on, but because I wasn’t ready to reveal anything about my new series.

But I think I’ve got enough of the first book to give you a tiny—exclusive!—peek:

Lady Freya de Moray has never had a season, never been courted. Due to the terrible scandal involving her brother, the Duke of Ayr, she’s been shunned. Now eight-and-twenty, she’s changed her name and found employment in London as a governess-cum-chaperone for two young girls. It’s unappreciated work, but she’s grown fond of her charges and made peace with her life.

Until, that is, she runs into Christopher “Kester” Renshaw, the Earl of Harlow, the man who helped ruin her brother and destroyed her life. Not only does the scoundrel not recognize Freya, he’s wearing the Ayr ring—a family heirloom taken off the finger of her brother the night he was disfigured. On the spot Freya decides to take back a little of what was snatched from her family…and steal that ring.

Elyse: Oh, like that’s going to be an easy book to wait for!

So if you’re thinking you’d like to try the Maiden Lane series, and you’re not sure where to start, Forever Publishing is making it very easy with a giveaway!

We have a complete set of all the paperback Maiden Lane novels, with signed bookplates, and a Forever romance tote bag for one lucky winner! 

YES. The ENTIRE paperback series, including:

That’s a lot of books – and it’s perfect for binge reading. To enter, just leave a comment and tell us what essentials you’ll have with you for this binge-reading extravaganza! 

Standard disclaimers apply: Open to US and Canadian readers. Fighting over your favorite Hoyt hero in the comments is definitely encouraged. Please acquire a chaperone for any Maiden Lane outings, and if you plan to binge read the series, make sure you have a significant amount of PTO or sick time at work! Comments will close Friday 27 October and a winner announced shortly afterward.

Good luck, and thank you to Elizabeth Hoyt and Grand Central/Forever!

Hmmm

Oct. 22nd, 2017 00:25
ysobel: (Default)
[personal profile] ysobel
I have a strange desire to do

A) a micro version of MaNoWriMo

(like, not even the 30k mini version, but, like. Average of 100 words/day as a primary goal -- yes, that's only 3000 in the month, and I used to be able to do that in a day, but that's more fiction than I've written all year -- with 10k as a secondary goal (333) and 30k as a tertiary (1k/day). Or maybe 10k as the primary goal? I don't know.)

B) that is a remix of Disney beauty and the beast

(not with lyrics and shit, and I could just do a regular batb retelling, but I kind of want to take the Disney specific stuff, gaston and the west wing and the specific castle staff, and play with it and make it better. A few elements of the live version but mostly based on the animated one.)

(which is for one thing ridiculous because Disney version, and for another thing cheating for nano because pre-existing story, and for a third feels lazy and cop-out-ish and why would anyone read a 10k-word retelling of a fucking Disney movie, and all the rest of the bullshit that my inner critic likes to dump in my head whenever I want to do something)

I definitely don't want to nano the disabled-beauty/autistic?-beast story-of-my-heart, because it's too important for Nani treat,net, and I need something that means less. But.

Stupid idea? Good idea? Shut up and go back to crocheting?
starwolf_oakley: (Default)
[personal profile] starwolf_oakley posting in [community profile] scans_daily
Here's a page from a flashback to when Tony Stark met Mary Jane Watson. I am not quite sure when it takes place, but it happens when Mary Jane was a model and when Tony was hitting the sauce. So it is before IRON MAN #128?

One page )
sovay: (PJ Harvey: crow)
[personal profile] sovay
Today was very pleasant but very tiring. It has been a sleepless week, most of yesterday was a migraine, and I feel exhausted to the point of stupidity. In lieu of a movie I really need my brain for, here's one I can talk about while wanting to pass out.

Last October I watched but never wrote about Norman Foster's Woman on the Run (1950), a famously near-lost noir painstakingly restored by the UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Film Noir Foundation and released last year onto home media as a double bill with Byron Haskin's Too Late for Tears (1949). Part of the delay is that I liked but did not love the former film as I did the latter with its stone cold antiheroine and uncompromising final shot; this one suffers more from the congealing sexism of the nascent Fifties and as a result its emotional resolution leaves a tacky taste on my teeth and an inchoate longing for the advent of no-fault divorce. If you can bear with its limitations, however, Woman on the Run is worth checking out as a thoughtfully layered mystery and a fantastic showcase for Ann Sheridan as an unapologetically bitchy, unsentimentally sympathetic protagonist, a rare combination in Hollywood even now.

The 1948 source short story by Sylvia Tate was titled "Man on the Run" and the film begins with one: late-night dog-walker Frank Johnson (Ross Elliott) who takes a powder on learning that the murder he conscientiously reported—and witnessed at close enough range to know the killer again—was connected to a high-profile mob trial. A failed artist with a bad heart and a marriage that's been on the rocks almost since it launched, he looks tailor-made for the dark city, a loser coming up on his final throw. The camera doesn't follow him into the night-maze of San Francisco, though, to face or keep running from his demons in the kind of psychomachia at which an expressionist genre like noir so excels; instead the point of view switches almost at once to his estranged wife Eleanor (Sheridan), wearily deflecting the inquiries of the hard-nosed Inspector Ferris (Robert Keith, who will always look like Lieutenant Brannigan to me) with flat sarcastic cracks and an indifference so apparently genuine and total, it can take the audience a beat to recognize the depths of anger and resignation that underlie lines like "No, sometimes he goes to sleep and I walk the dog." Ever since Max Ophüls' The Reckless Moment (1949), I have been wary of assuming the limits of women in noir, but Eleanor still stands out for me in her flippant, abrasive intelligence and her willingness to look bad—she knows it shocks the conservative inspector that she isn't all housewifely concern for her man and she needles him with it, referring to the dog as their "only mutual friend" and dismissing the bare kitchen with "He's not particular and I'm lazy, so we eat out." Faced with the possibility that Frank has taken his brush with the underworld as an excuse to run out on his marriage, she's more than half inclined to let him. But she's not inclined to let him get killed, especially not playing star witness for a police force whose last star witness got whacked while Frank was watching, and so in the best traditions of amateur detecting, complete with dubious Watson in the form of "Legget of the Graphic" (Dennis O'Keefe), the flirty tabloid reporter who offered his services plus a thousand-dollar sweetener in exchange for exclusive rights to Frank's story, Eleanor sets out to find her missing husband before either the killer or a duty-bound Ferris can. He's left her a clue to his whereabouts, a cryptic note promising to wait for her "in a place like the one where I first lost you." In a relationship full of quarrels and frustrations, that could be anywhere, from their favorite Chinese hangout to the wharves of his "social protest period" to the tower viewers at the top of Telegraph Hill. Let the investigations begin.

I like this setup, which gives us the city as memory palace after all: Eleanor's memories of her relationship with Frank, what it was like when it was good and where it failed and how it might be reclaimed again, if she can only find him alive. She is almost being asked to perform a spell. And while I suppose she could have done it on the sympathetic magic of a Hollywood backlot, it is much more satisfying to watch her revisit real statues and sidewalks, real crowds unaware of the private earthquake taking place in their midst. Hal Mohr's cinematography is a street-level document of San Francisco in 1950, with a cameo by our old friend Bunker Hill; he can organize shadows and angles as effectively as the next Oscar-winning DP when he needs to, but he keeps the majority of the action on the daylit side of noir, the lived-in, working-class city with Navy stores and department stores and parks and piers and diners and lots of California sun, which only looks like it shows you everything. The literal roller-coaster climax was filmed at Ocean Park Pier/Pacific Ocean Park, last seen on this blog in Curtis Harrington's Night Tide (1960). Back at the Johnsons' bleak, hotel-like apartment, Eleanor mocked Ferris for "snoop[ing] into the remains of our marriage," but increasingly it seems not to be as cold a case as she thought. Going back over old ground, she discovers new angles on her missing person; nondescript in his introductory scenes and ghostly in his own life, Frank Johnson becomes vivid in absence, hovering over the narrative like Harry Lime in Carol Reed's The Third Man (1949) or the title character of Otto Preminger's Laura (1944) until his wife begins to see a curiously attractive stranger in the place of a man whose familiarity had long since bred hopelessness. To fall in love with someone who might already be dead, to find someone in the process of losing them, these are the kinds of irony that noir thrives on and Woman on the Run derives as much tension from the audience's fear that irony will carry the day as it does from the actual unknowns of the plot, the killer's identity, Frank's status, Eleanor's own safety as her sleuthing calls for ever more active deception of the police and reliance on Legget, who keeps saying things like "I'm sorry I was so rude a moment ago, but it's always discouraging to hear a wife say that her husband loves her." He is another unexpected element, not without precedent but nicely handled. In most genres, his pushy charm and his genial stalking of Eleanor would mark him as the romantic hero, or at least an appealing alternative to a husband so avoidant he couldn't even tell his own wife when he was diagnosed with a serious heart condition. Here, with a triangle already established between Eleanor and the husband she knows and the husband she doesn't, the reporter is a fourth wheel at best and the audience hopes he accepts it. Without a reciprocating spark, it's not as cute as he thinks when he encourages Eleanor to call him "Danny Boy" ("People who like me call me Danny Boy") or leads her casually under the same wooden coaster where he used to bring dates, his contribution perhaps to the film's romantic psychogeography.

Honestly, I don't even dislike the resolution on the strict level of plot. By the time Eleanor realizes that the place where I first lost you isn't a bitter dig at a bad memory but a hopeful allusion to a good one, the audience is sufficiently invested in the reunion of these long-fractured lovers—despite the fact that we've never once seen them together, even in photographs or Frank's sketches and paintings—that to frustrate it would feel deliberately unfair, although of course in noir that never rules anything out. They're both taking chances, not just with their lives but their hearts. Frank who always runs away is standing his ground, risking being found by a gunman and a partner he's disappointed. Eleanor who has built such prickly defenses is lowering them, making herself reach out rather than preemptively rebuff. You want to see that kind of bravery rewarded, even when heart conditions and prowling killers aren't involved. What I dislike in the extreme is the film's attitude toward this conclusion. In its examination of the Johnsons' marriage, the facts of the script assign plenty of blame to Frank, an artist too scared of failure to try for success, a husband who retreated from his wife as soon as he felt that he'd let her down, a man who could talk about his feelings to everyone but the woman he was living with. The dialogue, however, insists repeatedly that the ultimate success or collapse of a marriage is the woman's responsibility—that it must be Eleanor's fault that her marriage went south, that she wasn't patient or understanding or supportive enough, that she has to be the one to change. It's implied in some of her encounters; in others it's stated outright. Inspector Ferris constantly judges her as a wife and a woman, even once asking "Didn't your husband ever beat you?" when she tells him to back off. He's the dry voice of authority, the hard-boiled but honest cop; I want to believe that Eleanor is decoying him when she apologizes for not believing his criticism sooner ("I guess I was the one who was mixed up—a lot of it's my fault anyway—I haven't been much of a wife"), but I fear we're meant to take her at face value. He's too active in the film's ending not to be right. Hence my wistful feelings toward California's Family Law Act of 1969. Sheridan's acting carries her change of heart from resolutely not caring to a clear-eyed second chance, but I almost wish it didn't have to. At least she has a good rejoinder when Frank queries their future together, wry as any of her defensive cracks: "If this excitement hasn't killed you, I'm sure I can't."

The movies with which Woman on the Run links itself up in my head are Robert Siodmak's Phantom Lady (1944) and Roy William Neill's Black Angel (1946), both stories of investigating women with ambiguous allies and ghostly romantic patterns; Sheridan's Eleanor is a harder, less conventionally likeable protagonist than either Ella Raines' Kansas or June Vincent's Cathy, which may account for why the patriarchy comes down on her with such personified, decisive disapproval, or it may be the distance from wartime, or it may be some other idiosyncratic factor that still annoys me. The fact that I can read the ending as happy rather than rubber-stamped heteronormativity is due almost entirely to Sheridan, who never loses all of Eleanor's edges any more than she slips out of her angular plaid overcoat into something more comfortable, plus the final cutaway to the Laughing Sal on the lit-up midway, rocking back and forth as if a husband and wife embracing is some great joke. Maybe it is. What makes this couple, so fervently clinging to one another, so special? He writes a nice love-note. She climbs out a skylight like nobody's business. They named their dog Rembrandt. This reunion brought you by my particular backers at Patreon.

Woman on the Run

More booky thoughts

Oct. 21st, 2017 21:42
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
Moomin ranting tonight a bit (charmingly) about wishing his class was broader than just European fairy tales but he also appreciates that it is focused and grounded in particular history.

I was thinking how I came up against that wall around the same age, a bit earlier, and went looking for "world" stuff or just anything not English, US based, "western culture" wanting to see anything possible. Anthologies were good or looking by specific country or ethnicity. I would root through any library or bookstore. Encyclopedias too. The indexes of books were super instructive. It took just years for me to have any real handle on the depth of the problems of histories but it was clear from the beginning that A LOT WAS WRONG. I didn't go into that (right now it is better if I listen to him than talk about my own thoughts)

Anyway! I'm so, so proud of Moomin and his excitement about scholarly things. I feel like no matter what he does in life he will have that kind of love of books and knowledge and stories.

He also really loved Gilgamesh so I am going to show him those awesome debates online between Hoe and Plough, Fish and Bird, etc.
umadoshi: (tomatoes 01)
[personal profile] umadoshi
Today's main accomplishment: getting a decent amount of manga work done despite being drained enough to wind up taking two accidental naps this afternoon. >.< I got close enough to a draft on the chunk of script due Monday that I expect that deadline'll be fine even if doing some garden work (planting bulbs and bagging up the tomato plants for compost pickup, mainly) takes up more of our time than expected tomorrow.

There are theories at the office about how much longer this stint of Casual Job will go, but what have we learned about attempting to make predictions? We'll see how it plays out.

[dreamwidth.org profile] scruloose and I have now made it as far as episode 3 of Star Trek: Disco, and we're also up to date on The Good Place. Given my work schedule(s), I'm counting it as a partial win. I really want to start in on The Gifted, though.

I haven't watched any of the anime for The Ancient Magus' Bride (either the OAV or the recently-started TV series), but in the last several days I've seen it mentioned quite a few times here and on Twitter, and that delights me. The manga series is fantastic--definitely one of my current favorites of the things I'm working on. (The other being Yona of the Dawn.) In theory I really want to watch the TV series, but realistically, I said that about the My Love Story!! anime too, and like so much other media I ~really want~ to consume, it keeps not happening.

For the longest time it felt like there weren't anime versions of any manga titles I've worked on, but it's never quite been true. I mean, Sgt. Frog had a (pretty long-running!) series and movies and all, although I gather the plots rarely adhered closely to the manga (and with that series, there's no need for them to, really); also, DN Angel got animated in some capacity (TV series?), but as I only actually worked on the final two volumes that Tokyopop released (vol. 12 and 13, I think?), it never sank in and felt like "my" series. And X has been animated twice, but I actively loathe the movie and am deeply grumpy about the TV series...

...and then there're the newer things that I keep wanting to see, but not finding time for: Arpeggio of Blue Steel, My Love Story!!, Yona of the Dawn, and now Magus are all out there. (Okay, no--I did see an episode or two of My Love Story!!, and that was wonderful.) (I feel like I might even be missing one. And now I suddenly really want someone to animate Lucifer and the Biscuit Hammer.)

Will I ever make it as far as checking those shows out for real? No idea. (I even have an ongoing Crunchyroll subscription, but I don't exactly make use of it. [Terrifying media-to-consume list, etc. etc etc.])

Last night was my fourth aerial silks class, so we're halfway through. It wasn't *bad*, but I also don't feel like I managed to do a whole lot )

[dreamwidth.org profile] scruloose and I are so utterly out of the gardening habit at this point. We don't have anything planted specifically for autumn, and we gave the tomato plants up for lost a couple weeks ago when I kept hearing that there was an overnight frost warning and last-ditch tomato harvesting should happen. So we did that, but since then I've been seeing local photos and stuff from gardeners carrying right along with harvesting their tomatoes etc. Next autumn we won't be so quick to say, "Oh, I guess we're done now."

A lot of the tomatoes we brought in at the abandoning-them point were still very green, but those all seem to have ripened up nicely. There's just one left now; [dreamwidth.org profile] scruloose has been working his way through them. The plants did produce some more fruit, but [dreamwidth.org profile] scruloose's experiment in eating one of those post-final-harvest tomatoes wasn't tasty, for whatever reason.

As a result of wandering off from dealing with the tomato plants, I should admit we've also completely slacked on dealing with the flowers. >.< Which isn't so bad for the potted annuals, because they have an expiry date, but we really need to double check what to do about the perennial bed and the potted raspberry shrub.

And whatever else happens, those bulbs need to get planted. *determined*

Life

Oct. 22nd, 2017 00:04
zhelana: (Marvel - Dancing Groot)
[personal profile] zhelana
What do you want to do with your life?

I always wanted to teach. When that turned out to not work out for me, I decided I'd collect information and teach it at SCA events. lol. I don't know that I have any other grand plans. I'd like to do a road trip of the northwestern part of this country because 5 of the 6 states I've never been to are up there. Finish out the country. Maybe hit every continent, too. I think I only need Australia and Antarctica to do it. Getting to Antarctica may be a trick.

the rest )

I know it is the nature of things

Oct. 21st, 2017 23:31
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
But I am a little surprised there don't seem to be ebooks of the Pliocene Saga. Or a North American edition younger than about twenty years.

DW crossposting housekeeping

Oct. 21st, 2017 20:02
hamsterwoman: (Default)
[personal profile] hamsterwoman
Another import, but there's only one entry from the last 2 weeks that didn't go up on DW first:

- Oct 15: 2 week roundup, and Kairos meme: 5 favorite genres

Dept. of Beautiful, Beautiful Son

Oct. 21st, 2017 21:33
kaffyr: The TARDIS at Giverny (TARDIS at Giverny)
[personal profile] kaffyr
This Is My Son, In Whom I Am Well Pleased

Do take a look. He's a handsome one, he is. )

My son turned 33 on Friday. I told him I loved him, and I told him not to get crucified, because that's the kind of disrespectful lapsed Christian-type joke that he appreciates (and hence the title.) We both snickered. We're both probably going to hell. 

He is wonderful. He is talented, creative, gentle, empathetic, kind, handsome. He sings, he writes radio plays. He writes songs for pantos. He is hard working, loving, and fannish. Oh, so very fannish. 

(And yes, he's enraged and frustrated me over the years. What child hasn't done that to his or her mother?)

He is, quite simply, Andy. I love him, and I am so very lucky he is my son. 

'Fans of Wet Circles'

Oct. 21st, 2017 21:34
masakochan: (Default)
[personal profile] masakochan
Holy dang the newest Dirk Gently episode was so damn good and I love everything that this show chooses to be.
[syndicated profile] allthingslinguistic_feed

lingthusiasm:

This is a transcript for Lingthusiasm Episode 12: Sounds you can’t hear - Babies, accents, and phonemes. It’s been lightly edited for readability. Listen to the episode here or wherever you get your podcasts. Links to studies mentioned and further reading can be found on the Episode 12 shownotes page.

[Music]

Gretchen: Welcome to Lingthusiasm, the podcast that’s enthusiastic about linguistics. I’m Gretchen McCulloch.

Lauren: And I’m Lauren Gawne, and today we’ll be talking about sounds that you can’t hear.

Gretchen: Phonemes!

Lauren: But first, so much exciting news: interview and live show!

Gretchen: So we reached our Patreon goal to start airing interviews on Lingthusiasm, and we are really excited to bring you an interview next month.

Lauren: Yay! I’m so excited that we met this goal, thank you as always to all of our patrons who support the show directly and allow us to keep building and growing and bringing in new things, including interviews!

Gretchen: So I got to talk to Nicole Holliday, who is an awesome linguist, at the Institute this summer, it was a really fun conversation.

Lauren: I am sooo jealous, I cannot wait to listen.

Gretchen: And we’re going to bring that to you next month! It was really fun.

Lauren: The other exciting news is that I’m gonna be in Montreal in a couple of weeks. In fact, about the time that this show goes out, for a conference and I just – I think I know someone who lives in Montreal?

Gretchen: I don’t know, who’s that, Lauren?

Lauren: Oh, it’s you! You live in Montreal!

Gretchen: Oh hey, it’s me!

Lauren: So this is completely unexpected and a delightful coincidence, and we thought we can’t pass up the opportunity while we’re in the same place to not do some kind of live show.

Gretchen: Surprise last-minute live show in Montreal, late September, it’s going to be at the Argo Bookshop on St. Catherine Street, it’s gonna be at 8 p.m. on Saturday the 23rd of September.

Lauren: So stay tuned to our social media for all the details, the opportunity to register for the event, and if you’re in Montreal, we look forward to seeing you there!

Gretchen: And there’ll be some sort of snacks! We haven’t figured out what kind of snacks there’s gonna be or what kind of drinks there’s gonna be, but there will be some sort of refreshments. So, come for the refreshments, stay for the linguistics!

Lauren: And I’m gonna need heaps of space in my suitcase to bring back all the maple products, so I will bring Australian-themed confectionery. If you see me there and you’ve listened to this episode, tell me and I will give you Australian-themed chocolate.

Gretchen: Hey Lauren, I’ve listened to this episode! You should give me some Tim Tams!

Lauren: Maybe.

Gretchen: And also, this month’s Patreon bonus episode – I almost forgot in the excitement about all the other new stuff that’s coming up – is about linguistics research: what kinds we’d like to see more of, how to do some of your own, and all the ways to find out stuff when your friends ask you about linguistics.

Lauren: You can find a link to our Patreon in the show notes and links to all of our bonus episodes as well.

Gretchen: And go to Lingthusiasm.com or @Lingthusiasm on Twitter or Facebook for details about the live show. 

[Music] 

Gretchen: So, what do we mean by sounds you can’t hear? This idea that language influences our perception is a really popular one in pop linguistics, and the idea of there’s these words that you can’t totally understand, there’s untranslatable words – Danish has this word for a sense of cosiness that we just can’t understand in English – this type of concept is really popular in pop linguistics, but it generally shows up at the word level. So you get these lists of words that are like, oh, this is this feeling, or this is this social relationship that exists in this language that you just can’t understand in English, and yet the list of untranslatable words often include English translations right beside them, which I’ve always found kind of ironic because, “Oh, you can’t translate this except for this translation that you can see here.”

Lauren: There are some lovely examples of this, though. I think it’s worth acknowledging that they show really interesting cultural foci, so we’ll put some links to the World in Words podcast, they have a couple of great episodes on untranslatable words across cultures that are really lovely, and their whole show is generally lovely stories about language anyway, so we’ll pop that in the show notes. But you’re right, it’s often this, “We can’t translate it in exactly one word,” not that they’re completely untranslatable.

Gretchen: Yeah, and what bugs me recently, when I’ve been thinking about this idea of untranslatability, is untranslatable words, you know, you can really translate them. But there’s another concept in linguistics that is very well-established, very well-studied, that you really can’t translate, where your linguistic experience really does shape your perception, and that’s in the area of sounds.

Lauren: Right.

Gretchen: So, when you’re born, you can hear and you can perceive any sound that could be relevant for any of the world’s languages.

Lauren: Uh-huh.

Gretchen: Then by the time you hit the age of, like, three months or six months or nine months, depending on the sound pairs, you lose that ability, and you retain the ability only to perceive the sounds that are relevant for the languages that you’re exposed to.

Lauren: That’s so early.

Gretchen: It’s so early!

Lauren: It constantly astounds me how early this happens.

Gretchen: And this is the type of concept that when you introduce it Intro Linguistics classes, people almost don’t believe it’s real, because we’ve spent our entire lives with our perception shaped from such a very young age. It’s kind of like optical illusions, you just see something and that’s it. So we’re just used to hearing a particular set of sounds, or used to paying attention to a particular set of sounds, irrespective of what we actually hear.

Lauren: And so it’s like growing up and only being told that the picture of the duck that rotates as a rabbit is a duck, and you’re like, “This is only a duck,” and then you can only see it as a duck.

Gretchen: Yeah, it’s this very powerful perception-type thing. Or, you know, finding out that some languages distinguish between dark blue and light blue as totally different colours. Something like, “Look, they’re just blue, like, I would call them both blue.” Um… we did a colour episode! Yeah, so it’s this thing that babies are really good at. And even toddlers have already started to behave like adults. Lauren, but how do we find out what the babies do?

Lauren: We know this because there have been some really great and thoughtful tests on how babies perceive sound, and it allows me to talk about one of my favourite linguistic research methodologies and psychology methodologies ever, which is known as high-amplitude sucking.

Keep reading

Dept.of I Forgot

Oct. 21st, 2017 21:07
kaffyr: Snark about fanfic (Adulthood? It's fanfic)
[personal profile] kaffyr
To Owls

You, 
[personal profile] owlboy , are amazing. You are a polymath, a wild person, a writer, an artist, and someone who would be mad, bad, and dangerous to know, if you weren't not bad, and a delight to know. I'm glad I met you here on the Intarwebz, and here's to a very, very good year for you. And I hope your birthday was fantastic.  

Dept. of Truly Lovely People

Oct. 21st, 2017 20:05
kaffyr: (See the Sky)
[personal profile] kaffyr
Late In The Day Birthday Wishes

I am so very lucky to know all of you out there in journal land, and two of the people I am particularly happy to have met celebrated birthdays today. What with cat purgatory, that almost slipped by me. 

[personal profile] a_phoenixdragon  is an adventurer in life, taking on journeys, challenges, setbacks and battles that many people would find impossible to undertake or survive. She is also one of those remarkable humans who can find beauty and good in the tiny corners where many of us would forget to look for them. She is creative, funny, a lover of knowledge, a woman who fights for the people she loves, and somehow finds time to create; she has never let her muse too far out of her sight, even if there are times she thinks the creature has escaped. I am so lucky to have met her in RL, and can report that she is one of the sweetest people I've ever met. And she talks more than I do - which is so cool! My dear, I hope your loved ones showed you how much they love you, and gave you a very good birthday. And may the coming year be better than you could dream of!

[personal profile] editrx  is another adventurer who has dealt with challenge, setback, and the fuckwittery of the world with more bravery and determination than I could ever imagine. In the midst of all that, she's generous with her time. She's funny, fannish, extremely good at what she does, and if I were the kind of fairy godmother I wish I could be, I would wave a wand and make sure that this happy birthday wish was accompanied by more than friendship and respect. May the coming year be thrice as good as you want it to be!

But wait, there's more!

The remarkable 
[personal profile] elisi , who celebrates on Oct. 22, is someone for whom I have so much respect that it's impossible to truly describe it. She writes fiction and non-fiction, meta and life observations, while raising a family of remarkable young women, and staying in touch with the world with intelligence and grace. Thank you for being you, and thank you for broadening my world in so very many ways, all through your love of a madman with a box, one that's bigger on the inside. If I am ever on your side of the Atlantic, it would be my honor to take you out for a drink of whatever might be your pleasure. Until then? Continue being awesome, and have a fantastic birthday. 


76F - 55F : Sunny

Oct. 21st, 2017 20:52
zhelana: (potter - alone)
[personal profile] zhelana
This morning started out a little rough. I rolled out of bed half an hour late. Then I went to the new parking lot for zoo employees and volunteers, and I couldn't figure out where it was. The only lot I found was being barricaded off by someone else's car. I wound up deciding to go to the Cherokee lot that we're not supposed to park in anymore. It was better than no-showing, right? So I got there, and I checked in with Sarah who asked if I had parked in the new lot. I was like "I tried, but I couldn't find it" she was like "it's okay, I was actually going to seek you out to tell you this since you're my only disabled volunteer that if you have handicap plates you can still park in the Cherokee lot." lol All that stress this morning for nothing. Although admittedly it may be better to park in the lot with a shuttle than have to walk in from street parking. Unless the shuttle is small and cannot take my walker? IDK.

Today was Boo at the Zoo, at which there is music, activities for kids, and trick or treating. I was responsible for passing out candy to kids who came trick or treating to my seat. Can I just say, what happened to "Trick or Treat?" More kids came up and said, "Can I have some candy please?" than actually came up and said "Trick or Treat." Although the most frequent response to seeing me was to open their candy bag and stand there silently. I gave each kid one piece of candy, and the ones who said, "thank you" got two although it very rarely actually happened. But good manners should be rewarded so if a kid said thank you unprompted I gave them extra candy. At least until the candy nazi came and sat beside me. She wouldn't even give kids another piece of candy if they'd already gotten candy from me. She was like "Just one!" I was like "bitch, did you buy the candy? (no, she was a volunteer) it's halloween. Give the kids their sugar rush." We wound up having plenty of candy, so there was no reason to be stingy.

Anyway, this was a lot of fun and I didn't even look at my watch until 2pm (it ran 11:30-3). I thought it was supposed to run until 3:30 but they shut down at 3, and I left. I got home and Kevin said Todd, Tara's husband, had been by to put up blinds, but they were the wrong size. I'm not sure how this has happened to him twice since he did measure, but whatever. Then around 4, Tara, Todd, and Todd's daughter showed up. Todd and his daughter moved the trash to the curb so they can more easily pick it up when they get a truck, and then built my bookshelf. Tara cleaned the kitchen. I talked to Tara while she cleaned. You guys, Tara cleaned the stove, and now it turns on all by itself without a match! Apparently all it needed was to be cleaned! I can cook all by myself now! This thing hasn't worked since before we moved in.

Todd and Tara left a bit after 7, and I went to take a shower.

Did I tell you guys how the infants I worked with when I worked at a preschool are graduating high school this year? Yeah, I feel old. lol. That was my first college job. Before I even had an LJ.

Also, my parents did end up extending an invitation to Klepto to come to our Thanksgiving. So that was nice of them :)

Vid: Ice (Babylon 5, Susan/Talia)

Oct. 21st, 2017 21:05
aurumcalendula: gold, blue, orange, and purple shapes on a black background (Default)
[personal profile] aurumcalendula posting in [community profile] girlgay
Title: Ice
Fandom: Babylon 5
Pairing: Susan Ivanova/Talia Winters
Music: Ice by Sarah McLachlan (The Freedom Sessions version)
Summary: Susan, Talia, and Psi Corps.
Notes: Inspired by Katharine's vid Ice. A huge thank you to [personal profile] gwyn for sending me a copy of Media Cannibals Tape 3 so I could see Katharine's vid! Thank you also to [personal profile] mswyrr for being an awesome beta!

References to Talia's fate in Divided Loyalties.
Quick cuts and flashes, particularly at 2:20 - 2:22, 3:08 - 3:10 and 3:15 - 3:19.


AO3 | DW | tumblr | youtube

A Dragon of a Different Color

Oct. 21st, 2017 21:04
marycatelli: (Golden Hair)
[personal profile] marycatelli posting in [community profile] books
A Dragon of a Different Color by Rachel Aaron

Book 4, picking up speed so that the volumes are more like divisions in a single story. Serious spoilers ahead.
Read more... )
aurumcalendula: image of Sonja Percy and Tammy Gregorio from NCIS New Orleans (Percy and Gregorio)
[personal profile] aurumcalendula posting in [community profile] girlgay
Title: Shock To Your System
Fandom: NCIS: New Orleans
Pairing: Sonja Percy/Tammy Gregorio, Hannah Lee/Tammy Gregorio, Eva Azarova/Tammy Gregorio
Music: Shock To Your System by Tegan & Sara
Warning/ Notes: quick cuts
Summary: Gregorio's chemistry with ladies in general and Percy in particular

AO3 | tumblr | youtube | DW

Damp kitty weather

Oct. 21st, 2017 17:33
primsong: (rain tree)
[personal profile] primsong
Looking out the window at my firs swooshing in the autumn-leaf-speckled wind, the bamboo bobbing along in agreement off behind them. Rain spatters on the windows and overhead I can hear the occasional thump-bumble-bumble of pinecones rolling down the slope of the roof.

Pi Cat literally is on a heavy rotation schedule from becoming lightly dampened on her all-weather pillow outside and being inside where there is always the potential for kitty treats if she's lucky. She peers at us through the sidelight on the front door (aka "the catwindow") and goggles in the bevel so it looks kind of crazy, signaling she'd like the door opened pretty much every time she catches anyone's eyes.

Time to get out "the cat towel" - an old towel that serves to mop wet paws and dry off a wet kitty when she comes in during the rainy months.
neotoma: Loki from Thistil Mistil Kistil being a dingbat (Loki-Dingbat)
[personal profile] neotoma
I went to see The Killing (1956) on Wednesday by myself, and the double feature The Taking of Pelham 1-2-3 (1974) and Charley Varrick with A (person to be pseudonymed later).

The Killing was excellent noir, full of chiascuro and dutch angles, with a tight tight script, including the final escape with the money being foiled by airline safety regulations!

For the double feature, Eddie Mueller, who hosts Noir Alley on Turner Classic Movies if you have that on cable, was there to introduce both movies. Since the theme of Noir City this year is "The Big Knockover: Heists, Hold-ups, and Schemes Gone Wrong", the Noir Foundation included several movies that are strictly speaking outside of the classic Noir genre, but are classics demonstrating the evolution of heist movies. Thus, we had 'Walter Matthau night' with the double feature.

The Taking of Pelham 1-2-3 (1974) )

Charley Varrick )

And tonight, because I wanted to, I made Flemish Waffles from Everyone Eats Well In Belgium. I omitted the cognac, because making waffles taste of alcohol is pretty much a Do-Not-Want for me, but they were pretty tasty nevertheless, and I have a stack of waffles for breakfast for the week; I'm still getting used to my waffle iron, and it's a bit tricky to get it adjusted to be Just Crispy Enough. The waffle was especially good with the salted brown sugar peach jam I put up several weeks ago, and tomorrow I might try it with the rest of the black raspberry preserve I have open, or the pear compote. Maybe someday I'll get some pearl sugar and try the recipe for Leige waffles -- though I think I'd need a different waffle iron to actually get them perfectly right.
[syndicated profile] wordpresstrac_feed

Posted by joyously

The Admin Bar is appended to the body of the page, and uses position: fixed for large windows. A space is made for it by using margin-top on the html tag.
This works fine until the media query for smaller windows changes it to position: absolute and there is user or theme CSS with body {position: relative}. The bar is then positioned relative to the body instead of html (leaving the margin visible and the bar over the top of body content).

I discovered this because I wanted to add a background overlay on the body, independent of the custom background, so I set the body position to relative and body:before to absolute.

A possible solution is to use body padding instead of html margin, but that might interfere more with theme CSS than the current method.

My FemslashEx story

Oct. 21st, 2017 17:18
rachelmanija: (Buffy: I kind of love you)
[personal profile] rachelmanija
I had tons of fun with FemslashEx, and highly recommend browsing the archive.

My recipient was [personal profile] iknowcommawrite aka Scioscribe, who wrote me two lovely Treats last Yuletide! FemslashEx allows prompts for original fiction, and this is the prompt I wrote for:

Female Revolutionary/Princess

Class issues, identity porn, loyalty kink, and compromised principles: hell yeah. I think ideally I would like this one in a fantasy world, but I’m open to other possibilities. I’d love to see about any variation on this I could think of. Is the revolutionary undercover in the palace, getting ready to overthrow the monarchy while falling for the princess? Is the princess on the run from the revolution, disguising herself, and falling in amongst the rebels? Do either of them begin to rethink their principles or their policies? Is the revolutionary agitating in the open, and the princess is intrigued by her radical ideas? Other things I’m totally here for: wearing a crown while being thoroughly debauched by a revolutionary, hurt/comfort, kneeling, undressing from gowns and corsets, and virgin princess/experienced revolutionary.

Isn't that great? I found it very inspiring.

I wrote Burn, an epistolatory exercise in Ultimate Identity Porn. The revolutionary hides her face to conceal her identity. The princess silences her voice to preserve her purity. They know each other. And they don't...

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